Broken bones in seniors

Do you realize that seniors that take a fall are at risk? It has been stated that three out of four elderly patients never fully recover after their tumble and that 25% actually die within the year of their injury? (Statistics were provided by Charles T. Price, MD, Orthopedic Surgeon, in today’s Daily Herald.)

Bone fractures themselves are not the dangerous issues. The dangerous part comes in when the broken bones “steal” nutrients from the surrounding healthy bones in order to heal the damaged bone. This creates a round robin of negativity.

First, the body becomes weaker due to inactivity. The person tends also to lose their appetite thus making them even more susceptible to getting sick or contracting more harmful infections, such as pneumonia. It can even affect their mental health!

Preventing big falls is the easy part for a caregiver. The issues come in when a client gets up to answer the phone, snags their foot on a chair and goes tumbling down or when they simply catch their toe on the carpet or hardwood floor and slip and hit a dresser – these incidents are what we caregivers need to pay attention to!

Our job is to ensure that we do what we can for With Age Comes Respect. Taking the best care of our clients is what we propose to do. Accidents will happen, but to avoid them is the best effort we can provide!

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About melissalstoneburner

Melissa is the proud mother of two boys. She also like to take care of all of her elderly clients as though they were her actual flesh and blood, too. Melissa began her elderly care business, Time to Care, in August, 2012. Since then, she has successfully seen several clients through life and onto the next life. She writes about what she knows, what she doesn't know, and reveals all the research in between. She believes that elderly care is the best thing she has ever done in life; second only to being a mother!
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