Aging lungs

A person’s lungs have two main functions which are both vital to a healthy system. The first is to get oxygen from the air into the body while the other is to remove carbon dioxide from the body. According to http://www.avweb.com/news/aeromed/181937-1.html?redirected=1, oxygen ‘enables the cells of the body to release the energy stored as high-energy chemical  bonds in our food, and enables them to use that energy to do what cells do: namely, to keep us alive, heart beating, brain thinking, and kidneys functioning.’ Carbon dioxide, on the other hand, is a gaseous waste that a human body produces once it uses the oxygen we breathe in.

The entire process is cyclical, beginning and ending in the lungs. As we inhale, air flows through our airways and into our lungs, filling the tiny sacs within called alveoli. As blood circulates around these air sacs through tiny blood vessels, the oxygen will cross into the bloodstream at the intersection of where the blood vessels and alveoli meet. This same intersection is where the carbon dioxide crosses from the bloodstream into the lungs to be exhaled. It is once all-around process of need and exceed. We need oxygen but must rid ourselves of carbon dioxide.

Now that the process has been explained, tomorrow we will delve further into what caregivers can look for to ensure the health and well-being of our clients. Noting changes will help us to show that we realize that With Age Comes Respect.

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About melissalstoneburner

Melissa is the proud mother of two boys. She also like to take care of all of her elderly clients as though they were her actual flesh and blood, too. Melissa began her elderly care business, Time to Care, in August, 2012. Since then, she has successfully seen several clients through life and onto the next life. She writes about what she knows, what she doesn't know, and reveals all the research in between. She believes that elderly care is the best thing she has ever done in life; second only to being a mother!
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