Strokes

According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, NINDS, a stroke occurs when the blood supply to part of the brain in suddenly interrupted or when a blood vessel in the brain bursts, spilling blood into the spaces surrounding brain cells. When this happens, brain cells die when they are no longer able to receive oxygen and nutrients from the blood. There can also be bleeding in or around the brain.

If your client suddenly complains of numbness or weakness – especially on one side or another side of their body – or if they begin babbling, seem confused, you can’t understand their speech, maybe they complain that they have trouble seeing – in one eye or in both eyes. If you see that your client is having troubles walking, appears to be dizzy, is constantly losing balance, seems uncoordinated or is complaining o a severe headache with no known cause, then it is time that you get them to the hospital or if the symptoms seem severe enough, call 9-1-1 right away.

You need to know that there are two forms of strokes:

  1. Ischemic – which is a blockage of a blood vessel supplying the brain
  2. Hemorrhagic – which is bleeding into or around the brain.

When you know all of this you can display the fact that With Age Comes Respect.

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About melissalstoneburner

Melissa is the proud mother of two boys. She also like to take care of all of her elderly clients as though they were her actual flesh and blood, too. Melissa began her elderly care business, Time to Care, in August, 2012. Since then, she has successfully seen several clients through life and onto the next life. She writes about what she knows, what she doesn't know, and reveals all the research in between. She believes that elderly care is the best thing she has ever done in life; second only to being a mother!
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