Why do elders revert to childlike behavior?

Every once in a while, a senior citizen acts and sounds like a young child. Many times this is because of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or Dementia with Lewy Bodies. This reversion should be very concerning to family and loved ones – and to that of a caregiver!

While the tendencies may be present during the daytime, they may become much more detrimental come the evening. Just like a child, the person may find one individual that they become completely dependent upon; “shadowing” them by constantly clinging closely by them.

Again, just like other tendencies, the shadowing becomes much more prevalent during the times, such as evening hours, when people with AD or Dementia tend to ‘sundown.’ This is because the person is typically tired during these times; may be worn down. This is why the confusion and fearfulness may increase.

And, just like with children, this fearfulness becomes even more confusing which causes the person to become more fearful. It is a round robin of negativity for them, thus the childlike behavior gets worse as well and the elder tends to need the person that they shadow even more.

This behavior can get so extreme that they have a hard time when their point person even goes to the bathroom alone. The freak out that they have is similar to a child’s tantrum.

Understanding this and stepping in to help shows that you believe that no matter what the circumstance that With Age Comes Respect.

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About melissalstoneburner

Melissa is the proud mother of two boys. She also like to take care of all of her elderly clients as though they were her actual flesh and blood, too. Melissa began her elderly care business, Time to Care, in August, 2012. Since then, she has successfully seen several clients through life and onto the next life. She writes about what she knows, what she doesn't know, and reveals all the research in between. She believes that elderly care is the best thing she has ever done in life; second only to being a mother!
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