Can a person with OAB still have quality of life?

Since OAB (Overactive Bladder Syndrome) can cause depression of the greatest sort, the fact that your client suffers from it – with no end in sight – may cause a devastating impact on their quality of life! They may be afraid of wetting accidents so they fail to go out with friends and family; isolating them from those they love the most!

Because of the isolation that they cause themselves due to their own insecurities, your clients may become more depressed as time goes along. Incontinence can actually become a disability to them!

Also, due to incontinence, your clients can physically suffer as well. Your clients may suffer from recurrent urinary tract infections which are painful. They may also suffer from urinary dermatitis – this is much more prevalent amongst your clients with urge incontinence versus those suffering from other OAB symptoms or controls.

The problem is that if your client suffers from urge incontinence then they may run the risk of falls and other associated forms of nonspine fractures. Why, you may ask? Well, it may be because they feel the urge and are rushing to get to the toilet if you are not present! This type of haste is referred to as urgemotivated haste. It refers to the fact that people are rushing to the toilet because they feel as though they have to urinate!

Being there to help your elderly clients once again proves that you believe that With Age Comes Respect!

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About melissalstoneburner

Melissa is the proud mother of two boys. She also like to take care of all of her elderly clients as though they were her actual flesh and blood, too. Melissa began her elderly care business, Time to Care, in August, 2012. Since then, she has successfully seen several clients through life and onto the next life. She writes about what she knows, what she doesn't know, and reveals all the research in between. She believes that elderly care is the best thing she has ever done in life; second only to being a mother!
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